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First Name: James

Last Name: Flowers

Birthplace: USA

Gender: Male

Branch: Army (1784 - present)



Home of Record: Dallas, TX
Middle Name: F.



Date of Birth: 16 March 1914

Date of Death: 28 November 2002

Rank: First Lieutenant

Years Served:
James F. Flowers, Jr.

   
Engagements:
•  World War II (1941 - 1945)

Biography:

James F. Flowers, Jr.
First Lieutenant, U.S. Army

On 6 July 1944, then-Second Lieutenant James F. Flowers, Jr. was serving with Company C, 712th Tank Battalion, 90th Infantry Division in the vicinity of Prétot-Sainte-Suzanne, France. Upon learning that an infantry battalion was cut off by enemy forces, 2LT Flowers loaded food and ammunition on the 3 medium tanks of his platoon and, at considerable risk due to the ammunition on the tank decks, tried to break through to the isolated unit. German tanks were known to be in the area and, due to stiff resistance and poor visibility, 2 successive attempts failed. Nevertheless, a 3rd attempt to reach the isolated troops succeeded on 7 July. This resulted in relief to the battalion and the evacuation of its wounded. 2LT Flowers' courageous actions earned him the U.S. Army's third highest award for valor, the Silver Star Medal.

On 11 July 1944, 2LT Flowers and his unit were in action against German forces at Foret de Mont Castre (Hill 122) in Normandy, France. 2LT Flowers led a combined tank and infantry assault to relieve a battalion surrounded by a strong force of German paratroopers. Again attacking on his own initiative under heavy enemy mortar and artillery bombardment, he led his force against a strong enemy position and suddenly came under deadly anti-tank fire. With flames leaping from the turret, despite the loss of his right foot from gunfire, he assisted the crew members in leaving the tank. To meet the new German assault, 2LT Flowers organized a defense with the surviving tankmen, using rifles, carbines, knives, and fists to drive off the Germans. After repulsing the attack, 2LT Flowers ordered all the men with minor wounds to withdraw while he remained with a seriously-injured infantryman. The following day, with their area under a heavy concentration of artillery fire, an exploding shell destroyed his 2nd foot and severely wounded his companion again. Redressing their grave wounds as best he could, 2LT Flowers struggled desperately to maintain hope and life for his comrade and himself, until friendly infantry drove off the Germans and re-took the position. 2LT Flowers' inspiring leadership, selfless, courageous actions and extraordinary heroism that day earned him the U.S. Army's second highest award for valor, the Distinguished Service Cross.

The daring drive by C Company's tanks described above resulted in great gain but at a tragic cost. An entire platoon of 4 tanks was wiped out and most of the personnel wounded or killed. The survivors of this ambush were isolated for several days and during that time they were subjected to both friendly and German artillery shelling. The men were also frequently engaged in hand-to-hand fighting.

Medals, Awards and Badges

Distinguished Service Cross
Silver Star Medal
Purple Heart
American Campaign Medal
European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with Bronze Star
World War II Victory Medal
Combat Infantryman Badge

Distinguished Service Cross Citation

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to First Lieutenant (Infantry), [then Second Lieutenant] James F. Flowers, Jr. (ASN: 0-1017690), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while Commanding a platoon of Company C, 712th Tank Battalion, 90th Infantry Division, in action against enemy forces on 11 July 1944, at the Foret de Mont Castre (Hill 122) in Normandy, France. Lieutenant Flowers led a combined tank and infantry assault to relieve a battalion surrounded by a strong force of enemy paratroopers. Again attacking on his own initiative, under heavy enemy mortar and artillery bombardment, he led his force against a strong hostile position. Suddenly they came under deadly anti-tank fire. With flames leaping from the turret, despite the loss of his right foot from gunfire, he assisted the crew members from his tank and, to meet the new German assault, quickly organized a defense with the surviving tankmen, using rifles, carbines, knives, and fists to drive off the foe. After the repulse of the attack, he ordered all men not too badly wounded to withdraw, while he remained with a seriously injured infantryman. The following day, with their area under a heavy bombardment of artillery fire, an exploding shell destroyed his second foot and again severely wounded his companion. Redressing their grave wounds as best he could, he struggled desperately to maintain hope and life for his comrade and himself, until friendly infantry drove off the Germans and again took the position. Lieutenant Flowers' courageous leadership, heroic conduct, and devotion to his comrades are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

General Orders: War Department, General Orders No. 147 (December 9, 1946)

Death and Burial

First Lieutenant James F. Flowers, Jr. died on 28 November 2002. He is buried at Restland Memorial Park in Dallas, Dallas County, TX, in the Woodland Section.

https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84306688



Honoree ID: 312992   Created by: MHOH

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